Current Clinical Research Trials for ALS

Researchers at The GW Medical Faculty Associate’s ALS Clinic are conducting clinical research trials to learn more about amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or as more commonly known, Lou Gehrig’s Disease.

Clinical research trials search for new ways to prevent, understand and/or treat disease. The goal of these trials is to see if a new treatment, procedure or device works and is safe to use.  Participating in a research trial, as either a healthy volunteer or a patient volunteer, is an opportunity to help researchers find better treatments for others in the future.

The following are clinical research trials specific to ALS:

 

PENNANT Study

Title: A Multicenter, Double Blind, Placebo Controlled Study to Assess the Efficacy and Safety of H.P. Acthar® Gel in the Treatment of Subjects With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Principal Investigator: Elham Bayat, M.D.

Status of Research Trial: Open to enrollment

Sponsor of Research Trial: Mallinckrodt

Description of Research Trial:

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, is a disease of the nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord that control voluntary muscle movement. In ALS, progressive death of motor neurons leads to denervation of skeletal muscles. The primary objective of this study is to examine the effect of H.P. Acthar® Gel on functional decline in adult subjects with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

Research Trial Contact Information: For more information, interested participants and clinicians may contact the Neurology Clinical Research Unit at neurostudies@mfa.gwu.edu. 

 

REFALS Study 

Principal Investigator: Elham Bayat, M.D.

Status of Research Trial: Open to Enrollment

Sponsor of Research Trial: Orion Pharma

Description of Research Trial:

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, is a disease of the nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord that control voluntary muscle movement. In ALS, progressive death of motor neurons leads to denervation of skeletal muscles. This study will evaluate whether prolonged oral levosimendan can preserve respiratory function more effectively than placebo.

Research Trial Contact Information: For more information, interested participants and clinicians may contact the Neurology Clinical Research Unit at neurostudies@mfa.gwu.edu.