MLT to MLS: BSHS in Medical Laboratory Science (Fully Online)

Overview 

The fully online BSHS with a major in Medical Laboratory Science (MLS) for certified MLTs requires a minimum 60 and a maximum 68 of transferred credits from a regionally accredited college or university and then 60 credits of GW coursework. Students will complete the program with a total of 120 credit hours divided into four degree components:

  • General Education (38 credit hours)
  • Electives (30 credit hours)
  • MLS Major Courses (46 credit hours)
  • Online Writing Courses (6 credit hours)

Students must complete at least 52 credit hours of GW coursework to meet the academic residency requirements for the online program.

Structure

Students complete the program in two phases.  Phase I includes online didactic courses and Phase II includes hands-on practicum courses that students complete in an approved clinical site as well as a capstone seminar course.

The program is offered in a lock-step format where students take a trio of courses each semester during the didactic phase (Phase I) and complete the clinical rotations and capstone seminar (Phase II) in the final semester.  Courses are offered in 8-week and 15 week formats.

To maintain the academic integrity of the program, the GW MLS program requires that students use a web-based remote proctoring system called Remote Proctor Now in every MLS-designated course throughout the program. Additional information on this system from Software Secure, Inc. can be found at this address: http://www.softwaresecure.com/product/remote-proctor-now/. See below the IT requirements to use Remote Proctor Now.

 

Transferable Coursework (60-68 credits)

General Education (38 credits)

  • English Composition (3 credits)
  • Biology (lecture and ‘hands-on’ lab) (8 credits)
  • Microbiology (lecture and ‘hands-on’ lab) (4 credits)
  • Chemistry (lecture and ‘hands-on’ lab) (8 credits)
  • Organic Chemistry or Biochemistry (3 credits)
  • College Algebra, Statistics, or higher (3 credits)
  • Humanities (3 credits)
  • Social Sciences (6 credits)

* Military students that have completed the MLT training program at the Medical Education Training Campus (METC) may receive transfer credits for General Microbiology and some Chemistry coursework. GW-METC Partnership (Army/Navy) MLTs may need additional Biology and Chemistry coursework, depending on their academic preparation. Air Force MLTs, should contact the program office for more information regarding requirements.

Electives (22-30 credits)

  • Minimum of 22 and up to 30 transfer credits from previous institutions. 8 credits can be fulfilled at GWU with Health Sciences online courses. 
 

GW Course Offerings

Phase 1

MLS Required Didactic Online Courses

MLS 4141: Immunology & Serology (3 credits)

Principles of the immune system’s components, functions, interactions with microorganisms, and the clinical applications of immunologic assays to human health and disease.

MLS 4158: Laboratory Management and Operations (3 credits)

Introduction to critical concepts of lab management, including leadership theory, management principles, human resource management, financial management, quality management, and laboratory operations. Proctor fee.

MLS 4145: Clinical Biochemistry I (3 credits)

This course studies the methodologies employed in the chemical analysis of human blood and body fluids. This includes an examination of the fundamentals of measurement and the principles of instrumentation as they relate to the assay of each analyte studied. In addition, the laboratory results are correlated with the clinical significance and pathophysiology which may generate changes in the analyte. Throughout the course, the quality assurance measures required to ensure reliability and validity of the laboratory results are also emphasized. Proctor fee.

MLS 4146: Clinical Biochemistry II (3 credits)

This second course in clinical biochemistry continues the study of the measurement and interpretation of chemical constituents in human blood and body fluids. The laboratory results of each analyte are correlated with the clinical significance and pathophysiology which may generate changes in the analyte. Throughout the course, the quality assurance measures required to ensure reliability and validity of the laboratory results are also emphasized.

MLS 4116: Clinical Bacteriology I (3 credits)

Principles of clinical microbiology with emphasis on pathogenic characteristics, isolation, and identification of bacteria related to human disease; theoretical approach to the current diagnostic techniques and identification systems used in clinical practice. Proctor fee. Restricted to students in the medical laboratory science program. Prerequisites: BISC 1111 and BISC 1115.

MLS 4117: Clinical Bacteriology II (2 credits)

The etiology of infectious diseases in different body sites with an emphasis on the epidemiology, pathogenic mechanisms, and laboratory identification of suspected etiologic agents; specimen collection and handling, diagnosis and treatment of medically significant bacteria. Proctor fee. Restricted to students in the medical laboratory science program. Prerequisites: BISC 1111 and BISC 1115.

MLS 4150: Immunohematology (3 credits)

The major blood group systems that affect the practice of transfusion medicine and examines the processing and distribution of blood products supplied by transfusion services. Proctor fee.

MLS 4119: Parasitology, Mycology and Virology (2 credits)

Principles and procedures involved in the diagnosis of parasitic, fungal, and viral infections; disease causation, specimen collection and handling, laboratory identification and treatment of medically significant fungi, parasites, and viruses. Proctor fee. Restricted to students in the medical laboratory science program. Prerequisite: BISC 1112.

MLS 4130: Hematology I (3 credits)

Study of the blood and blood-forming tissues with emphasis on hematologic techniques and cell identification; anemias and non-malignant leukocyte disorders. Proctor fee. Restricted to students in the medical laboratory science program. Prerequisites: BISC 1111 and BISC 1115.

MLS 4131: Hematology II (3 credits)

Study of the blood and blood-forming tissues with emphasis on white blood cell disorders; introduction to the hemostatic system and associated coagulation disorders. Proctor fee. Restricted to students in the medical laboratory science program. Prerequisites: BISC 1111, BISC 1115 and MLS 4130.

MLS 4151: Molecular Diagnostics (3 credits)

Introduction to the molecular techniques used to diagnose human disease; technology, theory, and methodology of specific molecular protocols that can be used within a clinical laboratory setting to aid in disease diagnostics including those of genetic, oncogenic, and infections origin. Proctor fee.

MLS 3000: Laboratory Math (3 credits)

Basic mathematical techniques used in the clinical laboratory, including exponential and logarithms, measurement systems, solutions and concentrations, proportionality, graphing, statistics and quality control, and method evaluation; practical applications of data analysis. An equivalent college-level mathematics course or permission of the program director may be substituted for the prerequisite. Restricted to students in the medical laboratory science program. Prerequisite: HSCI 2117.

MLS 3001: Ethics for Laboratory Medicine (3 credits)

Ethical and professional conduct of and dilemmas encountered by medical laboratory professionals. Proctor fee. Restricted to students in the medical laboratory science program.

Required Online Writing Courses (6 credits)

HSCI 2112W: Writing in the Health Sciences (3 credits)

Introduction to the health sciences literature. Emphasis is on construction, evaluation and organization of written communication of health sciences information.

HSCI 4112W: Research and Writing in the Health Sciences (3 credits)

Electives (8 credits)

Up to 8 credits can be transferred in to fulfill requirement or students can choose from the following Health Sciences online courses

HSCI 2101: Psychosocial Aspects of Health and Illness (3 credits)

Comprehensive introduction to the psychological and social aspects of health and wellness. Emphasis on the development of communication skills and the establishment of caring relationships. Discussions of special situations such as working with dying patients and patients with self- destructive behaviors.

HSCI 2102: Pathophysiology (3 credits)

Biomedical and scientific framework for the understanding of human disease mechanisms and biologic processes. Overview of infectious, immunologic, cardiovascular, genetic, respiratory, gastrointestinal, neoplastic, reproductive, renal, hematologic, neurologic, and musculoskeletal diseases.

HSCI 2105: Current Issues in Bioethics (3 credits)

Basic issues, approaches, and requirements of ethically acceptable decision making with patients, including patient confidentiality, conflicts of interest, allocation of scarce resources, occupational risks in health care, and professional responsibility for overall quality of care.

HSCI 2107: Health Care in Literature (3 credits)

Literature, as well as TV and film, has shaped the public’s attitude toward health care for as long as storytelling and health care have coexisted. In the last hundred years, health care related discoveries have proliferated, benefiting from innovative research, while society remains plagued by many of the same problems such as the treatment of family violence, the extreme stigma of certain illnesses, or disparities in access and quality of health care. By studying literature, medical journals, as well as some visual media that have engaged with these and other health care issues, students will acquire a better understanding of how cultural attitudes toward health care are created, altered, and reinforced. Through assignments, students will explore how literature forms or expresses society’s attitudes on controversial health care issues, and what these opinions mean for practitioners and patients.

HSCI 4106: Intro to Epidemiology for HS (3 credits)

An introduction to epidemiological methods and their applications in the prevention and control of illness, community and clinical interventions, and health services.

Phase II

Required MLS Practicum Courses (9 credits)

MLS 4136: Clinical Experience I (2 credits)

Supervised clinical experience in clinical chemistry. Proctor fee.

MLS 4137: Clinical Experience II (2 credits)

Supervised clinical experience in microbiology. Proctor fee.

MLS 4138: Clinical Experience III (2 credits)

Supervised clinical experience in hematology, coagulation and urinalysis. Proctor fee.

MLS 4139: Clinical Experience IV (2 credits)

Supervised clinical experience in transfusion medicine and serology. Proctor fee.

MLS 4159: Capstone Seminar (1 credit)

Comprehensive review of medical laboratory science, which prepares students to sit for the board of certification examination. Integration of knowledge gained in didactic and practicum courses within the various laboratory disciplines, including hematology, microbiology, chemistry, and immunohematology. Proctor fee.

Download MLS Course Descriptions (pdf)

Semester

Fall

Spring

Summer

Semester 1

MLS 4141 

HSCI 2112W, 4112W 

MLS 4141 

HSCI 2112W, 4112W 

MLS 4141 

HSCI 2112W, 4112W 

Semester 2

MLS 4158

MLS 3000, 3001

MLS 4158

MLS 3000, 3001

MLS 4158

MLS 3000, 3001

Semester 3, 4, 5

MLS 4145

MLS 4146 

MLS 4151 

MLS 4130 

MLS 4131 

MLS 4150 

MLS 4116 

MLS 4117 

MLS 4119 

Semester 5

Clinical Experience 

Capstone Seminar

Clinical Experience 

Capstone Seminar

Clinical Experience 

Capstone Seminar

Example: Fall Entry: Fall 18-HSCI 2112W, 4112W, MLS 4141; Spring 19-MLS 3000, 3001, 4158 ; Summer 19-MLS 4116, 4117, 4119 ; Fall 19-MLS 4145, 4146, 4151 ; Spring 20-MLS 4130, 4131, 4151 ; Summer 20-Clinical Experience & Capstone

 

ASCP MLS Board of Certification Examination First Time Pass Rates:

 

GW first time pass rate

GW overall pass rate

National

2014

100%

100%

83.80%

2015

88.24%

94.11%

78.85%

2016

81.25%

87.50%

79.80%

2017

95.56%

95.56%

79.60%

2018

89.39%

93.93%

79.60%

Graduation Rates

100% of students who enter Phase II of the MLS program graduate

Employment Rates:

Greater than 95% of graduates are employed in the field within three months of program completion