COVID-19 Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions

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COVID-19 Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Updated: 2.19.21



ABOUT COVID-19 VACCINES

What COVID-19 vaccines are currently available?

The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines have both received Emergency Use Authorization from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and are currently available to certain populations in the U.S. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Different COVID-19 Vaccines).

Multiple COVID-19 vaccines continue to be under development. As of February  2021, there are four active clinical trials for COVID-19 vaccines in the U.S. The Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines have received Emergency Use Authorization in the U.S. (Source: COVID-19 Prevention Network: COVID-19 Clinical Studies).


Why are there different types of COVID-19 vaccines?

In May 2020, the U.S. government announced Operation Warp Speed, a vast public-private initiative led by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Defense to accelerate the development, manufacturing, and distribution of COVID-19 vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics. This helped fund as many companies as possible to develop, test, and manufacture a COVID-19 vaccine, before knowing which would be most effective. (Source: New England Journal of Medicine: Developing Safe and Effective Covid Vaccines — Operation Warp Speed’s Strategy and Approach).


How do the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines work?

All viruses have a unique genetic code. The Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines take part of the genetic code of the virus that causes COVID-19, called messenger RNA (mRNA), to tell our cells to make a specific part of the COVID-19 virus called the spike protein. The immune system then makes antibodies that quickly recognize this spike protein to destroy the virus and protect against it. These vaccines do not use the live virus from COVID-19. While these are new vaccines, mRNA vaccines have been researched for decades. Both the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines are very similar in how they work. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Understanding How COVID-19 Vaccines Work). (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Understanding mRNA COVID-19 Vaccines). (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Information about the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine). (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Information about the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine).


What is Emergency Use Authorization?

During public health emergencies, such as the current COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) can issue an emergency use authorization (EUA) to provide more timely access to critical medical products (including medicines, tests, and vaccines) that may help when there are no adequate, approved, and available alternative options. (Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration: Emergency Use Authorization for Vaccines Explained). 

The EUA process is different from FDA approval or clearance. Under an EUA, in an emergency, the FDA makes a product available to the public based on the best available evidence, without waiting for all the evidence that would be needed for FDA approval or clearance. This allows the FDA to make products available within weeks rather than months to years. EUAs are in effect until the emergency declaration ends but can be revised or revoked by the FDA at any time as scientists and physicians continue to evaluate the available data and patient needs during the public health emergency. (Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration: Understanding the Regulatory Terminology of Potential Preventions and Treatments for COVID-19).


Given how quickly these COVID-19 vaccines were developed, were "corners cut" in the process?

There were no "corners cut" in regard to scientific process and safety. As of January 2021, the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Emergency Use Authorizations (EUA) for two COVID-19 vaccines which have been shown to be safe and effective after review of data from the manufacturers and findings from large, multi-phased clinical trials. The data demonstrates that the known and potential benefits of the vaccine outweigh the known and potential harms of becoming infected with COVID-19. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control: Ensuring the Safety of COVID-19 Vaccines in the United States). 

Vaccines that receive EUA go through clinical trials with multiple phases. In phase 1 clinical trials, the vaccine is given to a small number of generally healthy people to assess its safety at increasing doses and to gain early information about how well the vaccine works to induce an immune response. In the absence of safety concerns from phase 1 studies, phase 2 studies include more people, where various dosages are tested on hundreds of people with typically varying health statuses and from different demographic groups, in randomized-controlled studies. These studies provide additional safety information on common short-term side effects and risks, examine the relationship between the dose administered and the immune response, and may provide initial information regarding the effectiveness of the vaccine. In phase 3, the vaccine is generally administered to thousands of people in randomized, controlled studies involving broad demographic groups (i.e., the population intended for use of the vaccine) and generates critical information on effectiveness and additional important safety data. This phase provides additional information about the immune response in people who receive the vaccine compared to those who receive a control, such as a placebo. The efforts to speed vaccine development to address the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic have not sacrificed scientific standards, integrity of the vaccine review process, or safety. (Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration: Emergency Use Authorization for Vaccines Explained)

The clinical trials are ongoing – volunteers will continue to be monitored and data will continue to be collected. GW is a clinical trial site for COVID-19 vaccines. To read more about GW’s role, visit covidvaccine.gwu.edu/.


What are the expected side effects of the COVID-19 vaccines?

Sometimes after vaccination, the process of building immunity can cause symptoms - this is normal and is a sign that the body is building immunity. The most common side effects from COVID-19 vaccines have included fatigue, muscle pains, joint pains, headaches, and pain and redness at the injection site. These symptoms were more common after the second dose of the vaccines and the majority of side effects were mild. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Understanding How COVID-19 Vaccines Work). (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: What to Expect after Getting a COVID-19 Vaccine).


Are the side effects the same for both the Pfizer-BioNTech and the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine?

Results from clinical trials show that their side effects and safety profiles are very similar. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Information about the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine). (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Information about the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine).


Are there any concerns about long-term effects from COVID-19 vaccines?

mRNA technology is not new and has been studied for decades. In fact, it has shown great promise for both infectious disease and cancer. Experts believe there is enough short-term data on the mRNA COVID-19 vaccines and long-term data on other mRNA vaccines to recommend getting vaccinated. 

While it cannot be stated affirmatively that there are no potential long-term effects, mRNA does degrade within a few days and it does not integrate into your DNA. It is believed the risk is quite low for long-term effects. Meanwhile, the risk of long-term effects from COVID-19 can be substantial. Volunteers from clinical trials will continue to be followed and monitored. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Understanding mRNA COVID-19 Vaccines)


Can I get COVID-19 from the vaccine?

You cannot get COVID-19 from the vaccine. The mRNA only allows your body to create the surface protein of the virus called the spike protein. Since it does not contain the whole virus, but only instructions for the spike protein, there is no possibility of getting COVID-19 from the vaccine. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: What to Expect after Getting a COVID-19 Vaccine).


How is the COVID-19 vaccine administered?

The vaccine is administered in the arm, similar to a flu shot. You will then be monitored for 15 minutes. If you have a history of severe allergies, you will be monitored for 30 minutes. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Vaccine Safety Monitoring and Reporting in Your Facility).


How many doses do I need? Why are there two doses?

For the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, you will need two doses, approximately 21 days apart. For the Moderna vaccine, you will need two doses, approximately 28 days apart. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: What to Expect after Getting a COVID-19 Vaccine).

The second dose allows the vaccines to be fully effective. The data does not suggest that one dose is adequate at this point. It is also expected that the longevity of protection would be much lower with a single dose, though more research is needed. (Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration: FDA Statement on Following the Authorized Dosing Schedules for COVID-19 Vaccines).


What if I do not get my second dose within the recommended time frame?

Make your second appointment as close to the recommended time frame as possible. Even if it is a week later, the data suggests you are just as likely to be protected. It is important not to skip your second dose, even if taken later. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: What to Expect after Getting a COVID-19 Vaccine).


When are the vaccines fully effective against COVID-19?

It typically takes a few weeks for the body to build immunity after vaccination. Peak immunity is expected shortly after the second dose. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Facts about COVID-19 Vaccines).


Does the COVID-19 vaccine stop me from getting infected? Can I still spread the virus to others after vaccination? 

At this time, there is not enough research to tell us whether the vaccines stop people from carrying the virus or passing it on to others. Therefore, it is vital to continue following all safety precautions such as wearing PPE and practicing physical distancing. It is also unknown if the vaccine prevents infection. We do know that it prevents symptomatic infection, especially severe illness. We do not know if it protects against asymptomatic infection and against spreading the virus. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Frequently Asked Questions about COVID-19 Vaccination).


Does the vaccine affect my risk of severe illness from COVID-19?

Individuals who become ill with COVID-19 but are vaccinated have a significantly reduced risk of becoming severely ill. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Benefits of Getting a COVID-19 Vaccine).


How many strains of COVID-19 are there?

There are multiple variants, including those detected in the U.S., U.K., South Africa, and Brazil. The variants have made the viruses more transmissible. Many of these variants seem to spread more easily and quickly. Scientists are working to learn more about whether there is increased risk of severe disease or death from these variants. (Source U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention: New COVID-19 Variants).


Does the COVID-19 vaccine protect against the new strains?

As of now, we are still confident the COVID-19 vaccines provide protection against the original strain, as well as these new variants. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: New COVID-19 Variants).


Will there be additional COVID-19 vaccines available?

As of January 2021, large-scale (Phase 3) trials are in progress or being planned in the United States by AstraZeneca, Janssen, and Novavax. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Different COVID-19 Vaccines).


After I get vaccinated, do I still need to wear a mask?

Yes. While experts learn more about the protection that COVID-19 vaccines provide under real-life conditions, it will be important for everyone to continue using PPE such as face masks and face shields/goggles, as well as practicing physical distancing. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: After Getting the Vaccine).


What is the recommendation on travel after vaccination?

Right now, all safety measures and policies will stay in place. Everything remains the same, even if you have had a vaccine. You must continue symptom monitoring, wearing PPE, practicing physical distancing, and limiting travel. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: After Getting the Vaccine).


VACCINATION IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

Are there any groups of people who should not get a COVID-19 vaccine?

Three main groups were excluded from the vaccine studies: children, those with immunosuppression, and pregnant or breastfeeding women. Individuals in these groups should consult with their health care provider. (U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Interim Clinical Considerations for Use of mRNA COVID-19 Vaccines Currently Authorized in the United States).


What is the recommendation for pregnant or breastfeeding women and the COVID-19 vaccine?

Pregnant or breastfeeding women should speak with their health care provider when considering whether to get a COVID-19 vaccine. While the clinical trials for the COVID-19 vaccines were not tested in pregnant or breastfeeding women, pregnant women are at higher risk of severe disease from COVID-19 and are part of the group recommended to get the COVID-19 vaccine if they choose. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Vaccination Considerations for People Who are Pregnant or Breastfeeding).

More information is available at the American Society for Obstetrics and Gynecology.


What is the recommendation for renal failure, dialysis, or transplant patients and the COVID-19 vaccine?

Those with chronic kidney disease and on dialysis were included in the clinical trials for COVID-19 vaccines. Those on immunosuppressive medication were not included and should consult with their health care provider. The CDC has added chronic kidney disease to its list of medical conditions putting patients at higher risk for severe disease from COVID-19 infection. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: People with Certain Medical Conditions).


If a person is on chemotherapy, is there a certain time they should get the COVID-19 vaccine?

Those receiving chemotherapy were not included in the clinical trial and should consult with their health care provider to determine when to get the vaccine.
 
It is generally recommended that vaccines not be given to patients undergoing chemotherapy or radiation treatment. This is largely because vaccines need a healthy immune system response to work. Such a response may be suppressed by cancer treatment. (Source: American Cancer Society: COVID-19 Vaccines in People with Cancer).


Are there any concerns for patients with filler injections getting the COVID-19 vaccine?

Yes, there have been reactions between those who have recently received certain types of filler injections and the vaccine. These rare reactions are temporary and respond to treatments such as oral corticosteroids and hyaluronidase, and often resolve without treatment. If you have concerns, please consult with your health care provider. (Source: American Society of Dermatologic Surgery: Guidance Regarding SARS-CoV-2 mRNA Side Effects in Dermal Filler Patients).


Should I get the COVID-19 vaccine if I have severe allergies?

Early data indicates that if you have a history of severe allergic reactions to vaccines or injectable medications, or ingredients in vaccines, you may be at increased risk of an allergic reaction to the COVID-19 vaccine. Please consult with your health care provider prior to vaccination.

The anaphylaxis reaction rate for the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is approximately 11.1 cases per million doses. The anaphylaxis reaction rate for the Moderna vaccine is approximately 2.5 cases per million doses. The majority of anaphylaxis reactions have been in people with a history of anaphylaxis or serious allergy. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Allergic Reactions Including Anaphylaxis After Receipt of the First Dose of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine – United States, December 14–23, 2020)(Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Allergic Reactions Including Anaphylaxis After Receipt of the First Dose of Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine — United States, December 21, 2020–January 10, 2021).

The majority are also occurring within the 15-minute observation period after getting the vaccine. People who have had severe allergic reactions or who have had any type of immediate allergic reaction to a vaccine or injectable therapy should be monitored for at least 30 minutes after getting the vaccine.

There have been reports that some people have experienced non-severe allergic reactions within four hours after getting vaccinated (known as immediate allergic reactions), such as hives, swelling, and wheezing (respiratory distress). If you have had an immediate allergic reaction—even if it was not severe—to any ingredient in an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, CDC recommends that you should not get either of the currently available mRNA COVID-19 vaccines. If you had an immediate allergic reaction after getting the first dose of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, you should not get the second dose. Please consult with your health care provider for additional care and advice. 

Low risk individuals include those with allergies not related to vaccines or injectable medications, such as seasonal, pet, or environmental allergies. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: COVID-19 Vaccines and Allergic Reactions).


If I have heart issues, should I get the COVID-19 vaccine?

It is highly encouraged that individuals who are at high-risk for severe disease from COVID-19 receive the vaccine. Those with heart conditions were specifically included in the clinical trials for the vaccines. (Source: American Heart Association: Heart Disease and Stroke Medical Experts Urge Public to Get COVID-19 Vaccinations).


Is there a minimum age for who can receive the COVID-19 vaccine right now?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has authorized the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for individuals 16 years and older. (Source: U.S. Food & Drug Administration: Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine).

The FDA has authorized the Moderna vaccine for individuals 18 years and older (Source: U.S. Food & Drug Administration: Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine).


If I had COVID-19, should I get vaccinated?

Yes, it is recommended that those who have already been sick with COVID-19 get vaccinated as it is unknown how long natural antibody protection will last. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) currently recommends waiting 90 days from infection if you were treated for COVID-19 symptoms with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma. Talk to your doctor if you don’t know what treatments you received or if you have other questions about the vaccine. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Frequently Asked Questions About COVID-19 Vaccination).


VACCINATIONS AT GW

What COVID-19 vaccine is available at GW?

GW is currently administering the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine.


Who is eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine at GW?

GW follows the District of Columbia COVID-19 Vaccination Plan. As of December 2020, all GW health care workers are eligible to get vaccinated. This includes contractors involved in patient care. GW health care workers can sign up to get vaccinated through a link sent via email or through the GW Hospital or GW Medical Faculty Associates intranets. 

As of January 2021, GW patients who are 65 years or older who reside in Washington, D.C. are also eligible. Patients can register at vaccinate.dc.gov. The GW Hospital and GW Medical Faculty Associates will also be reaching out to patients via phone and email on a rolling basis. We have many valued patients outside of the District. We encourage our patients who live outside the D.C. to access COVID-19 vaccine information from the health department in the state, city, or county where they reside. More information is available for GW patients at smhs.gwu.edu/covid-19-vaccine. (Source: DC Health: Vaccination Program Phases with Tiers).


How will you identify who gets the COVID-19 vaccine at GW?

The U.S. Government has laid out vaccination prioritization groups for the U.S. GW will follow these guidelines, in addition to those laid out by DC Health and guidance from the District of Columbia Hospital Association. (Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices’ Updated Interim Recommendation for Allocation of COVID-19 Vaccine -- United States, December 2020). (Source: DC Health: Vaccination Program Phases with Tiers). (Source: District of Columbia Hospital Association: COVID-19 Resource Center). 


When will I be able to receive the COVID-19 vaccine at GW?

GW will continue to follow guidelines from DC Health on vaccination distribution. As of February 2021, D.C. is in Phase 1b Tier 3 and we are providing vaccinations to individuals prioritized in this group, which includes GW health care workers and a subset of GW patients. More information is available at smhs.gwu.edu/covid-19-vaccine. (Source: DC Health: Vaccination Program Phases with Tiers).


Where will I get the COVID-19 vaccine at GW? 

GW is administering the vaccine at the GW Lerner Health and Wellness Center, located at 2301 G Street, NW, Washington, D.C. in Foggy Bottom. If eligible to receive the vaccine, you will be contacted by GW to set up an appointment time.


How long does it take to get the COVID-19 vaccine at GW?

Please plan on 45 minutes for the entire process. This includes 15 minutes of monitoring time. If you have a history of severe allergies, you will be monitored for 30 minutes.


Is there a cost for receiving the COVID-19 vaccine at GW?

The vaccine will be offered at no cost to all individuals interested and eligible. However, insurance information will be requested for GW patients. 


How will I schedule my second dose for the COVID-19 vaccine at GW?

GW will work with each individual to schedule their second dose.


How will you ensure the safety of administering the COVID-19 vaccine?

GW staff will be wearing PPE and practicing social distancing when administering the vaccine. In addition, all GW staff providing the vaccine will be educated and trained in advance. Those receiving the vaccine will be monitored for 15 minutes after receiving the vaccine. Those with a history of allergies will be monitored for 30 minutes. 


Does GW provide vaccines for other sites or locations?

Since GW has advanced cold-storage facilities, GW is serving as one of Washington, D.C.’s local hubs for distribution in a “hub and spoke” model.

GW’s spoke facility is the Psychiatric Institute of Washington (PIW). They will receive their allotment as determined by DC Health. Since GW can safely store the vaccine, GW is holding the vaccine for PIW. At this time, GW has not been assigned additional spokes.


How often will vaccines be received at GW?

The D.C. government has stated that health care facilities will be receiving vaccines on a rolling basis.


VACCINATIONS FOR GW HEALTH CARE WORKERS

Which GW health care workers are currently eligible to get the COVID-19 vaccine?

All GW health care workers are now eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine at GW.


How can GW health care workers sign up to receive the COVID-19 vaccine?

All GW health care workers must complete registration in the COVID-19 Vaccine Portal, which was sent via email and is available on the intranet at GW Hospital and the GW Medical Faculty Associates. Please note that by completing this form you are not committing to being vaccinated, but rather communicating interest. In order to know who is willing to be vaccinated and to offer vaccines in a fair, equitable, and transparent manner, your prompt submission to the COVID-19 Vaccine Database is appreciated.


Are contractors eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine as a GW health care worker?

Contractors at the GW Hospital and GW Medical Faculty Associates are essential to health care and GW is including these populations as well.


How will I be notified if I am selected to receive the vaccine as a GW health care worker?

The GW Hospital Employee Health will contact you via email. If you have not seen an email but believe you are eligible, please complete registration in the COVID-19 Vaccine Portal, which is available on the GW Hospital and GW Medical Faculty Associates intranets.


If I am identified as an initial recipient for the COVID-19 vaccine, as a GW health care worker, can I decline and “donate” to someone else?

No, you cannot “donate” your vaccine to someone else. The U.S. Government has laid out vaccination prioritization groups. GW will follow these guidelines, in addition to those laid out by DC Health and the DC Hospital Association.


If I change my mind from “no” to “yes,” can I still get the vaccine as a GW health care worker?

Yes, you can always change your mind. You just need to re-submit your information in the portal and state you are interested in receiving the vaccine.


Is the COVID vaccine required for GW health care workers?

No, we are not requiring that personnel receive the COVID-19 vaccine, but we highly encourage individuals to consider signing up to receive the vaccine.


Will getting the vaccine impact whether I provide care for COVID-19 patients?

No, regardless of whether or not you receive the vaccine, you may still be assigned to care for COVID-19 patients.


How many doses have been administered to GW health care workers? 

We have administered more than 10,000 doses to GW health care workers, as of February 2021. About 250 people are vaccinated every day we have a full clinic. We expect to finish vaccinating all of our staff in the coming weeks. 


What is the time frame for administering vaccines to GW health care workers? 

We will be administering vaccinations on a rolling basis.


Will all GW health care workers who want a vaccine be able to get one? 

Everyone who is interested and eligible to receive a vaccine will be able to get one.


VACCINATIONS FOR GW PATIENTS

Which GW patients are currently eligible to get the COVID-19 vaccine? 

GW follows the District of Columbia COVID-19 Vaccination Plan. GW patients who are 65 years or older who reside in Washington, D.C. are currently eligible to receive the vaccine at GW. Patients can register at vaccinate.dc.gov. The GW Hospital and GW Medical Faculty Associates will also be reaching out to eligible patients via phone and email on a rolling basis. More information is available for GW patients at smhs.gwu.edu/covid-19-vaccine. (Source: DC Health: Vaccination Program Phases with Tiers).


How can eligible GW patients sign up to receive the COVID-19 vaccine?

The GW Hospital and GW Medical Faculty Associates will be reaching out to eligible patients via phone and email on a rolling basis. GW patients who are eligible to receive the vaccine will receive an invitation with a registration link. If you are eligible and have not yet received an invitation, you should sign up at vaccinate.dc.gov.


If I am a GW patient, but am not currently eligible, when can I expect to receive the vaccine?

GW will continue to follow guidelines from DC Health on vaccination distribution. As of February 2021, D.C. is in Phase 1b Tier 3 and we are providing vaccinations to individuals prioritized in this group, which includes GW patients who are 65 years or older who reside in Washington, D.C. We will make this vaccine more widely available as we receive additional doses and as D.C. moves into new phases and tiers. (Source: DC Health: Vaccination Program Phases with Tiers).


Can GW patients who live in Maryland and Virginia get vaccinated at GW?

GW is required by DC Health to only vaccinate GW patients who reside in D.C. We encourage our patients who live outside D.C. to access COVID-19 vaccine information from the health department in the state, city, or county where they reside. Maryland residents can visit covidlink.maryland.gov. Virginia residents can visit vdh.virginia.gov/covid-19-vaccine. We encourage GW patients to take the first vaccine offered to you and get your second dose at the same site. The best vaccine to get is the one you can get the soonest.


How will I be notified if I am eligible to receive the vaccine as a GW patient?

GW Hospital and GW Medical Faculty Associates will be reaching out to eligible GW patients via email and phone on a rolling basis.


Is there a cost for receiving the COVID-19 vaccine as a GW patient?

The vaccine will be offered at no cost to all individuals interested and eligible. However, insurance information will be requested for GW patients.